International Space Art Network

Welcome to a place of vision and beauty. Welcome to the world of space art.

Here's a definition of Space Art:

Space art is a general term for art emerging from knowledge and ideas associated with outer space, both as a source of inspiration and as a means for visualizing and promoting space travel. Whatever the stylistic path, the artist is generally attempting to communicate ideas somehow related to space, often including appreciation of the infinite variety and vastness which surrounds us. In some cases, artists who consider themselves space artists use more than illustration and painting to communicate scientific discoveries or works depicting space; a new breed of space artists work directly with space flight technology and scientists as an opportunity to expand the arts, humanities and cultural expression relative to space exploration.

Today I discovered the journal, Astrona, on the web with the url:

http://astrona.blogspot.com/2006/08/history-of-space-art.html
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Astrona is an online collection of artists resources and developers who are specialising in space and astronomical art, science fiction art, visions of future worlds, design and visualization of technologies for living in space, space exploration, spaceships, starships, space colonies, etc. Take a journey through amazing images! Content periodically updated as new material becomes available. Contact Astrona.
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This is the first that I've been aware of this Journal. Many of the artworks of our space artists are found there including novel new unknown space artists.

Have they been contacted? Did they give their permission to use their art? Is this a "new" agency like the one in the music business where royalties are paid to the artist by someone that chooses to display the artwork of an artist on display, like the songs that we hear on the radio?

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Here is the list of names that have their art on the Astrona website:

• Bjorn Jonsson (1)
• Don Davis (1)
• Don Dixon (1)
• Frank Hettick (1)
• Frank M. Lewecke (1)
• Gary Tonge (1)
• Joe Bergeron (1)
• Joe Tucciarone (1)
• Julie Rodriguez Jones (1)
• Mark A. Garlick (1)
• Michael Boehme (1)
• Pat Rawlings (2)
• Rick Sternbach (1)
• Walter Myers (1)
• William K. Hartmann (1)
• IAAA (1)

Please let us know whether you have authorized the use of your art.
Thanks for the list Kara. I don't ever recall having given Astrona permission to post my image, but the fact that they correctly cite the image and include a link to my website makes me reluctant to give them grief about it. Maybe at the very least I should let them know I'm aware of the (unauthorized) use?
I think it comes down to a question of courtesy. It's all well and good that they attached attribution...but did they bother to ask you if you even wanted to have your art on their site? It's the very least that could have been done.


Walter Myers said:
Thanks for the list Kara. I don't ever recall having given Astrona permission to post my image, but the fact that they correctly cite the image and include a link to my website makes me reluctant to give them grief about it. Maybe at the very least I should let them know I'm aware of the (unauthorized) use?
It is all well and good that there is a "Space and Astronomical Art Journal" out there with our members art et cetera; however, I constantly see complaints being voiced that 'this-and-that-site has my art without permission'. Others voice that 'oh I don't mind the free publicity' disregarding whether they were paid. Still others complain that this free use of spaceart under cuts their own ability to earn income from their single source revenue stream--making art.

Here are some thoughts for consideration:

1) Is it fair to infer that space artists prefer that their art is out there and that they appreciate the increased traffic to their website?

2) Are these Rogue-websites, that we discover periodically and who claim to be promoting the genre of space art, really at all beneficial and/or troublesome?

I suppose there are some pros and cons; perhaps, the more of the public sees that the genre is thriving, if not expanding as the 21st century unfolds and that if these Rogue-websites are NOT making marketing resources from their pitch, then "who cares?", as long as the documenting of the artists of this movement find immortality in the annals of art history.

3) Is someone making money stealthily [finders fees], all the while promoting artists without their permission?

Surely a non-profit foundation, such as the IAAA, could better serve the space artists of the genre by being able to expand space artists rights and privileges the world over? Consequences may include renewed respect as a Thematic genre, an "ism", leading to invitations to showcase the movement in galleries, museums, coffee table books, college curriculum inclusion, etc. If indeed there is a difference between sub-genres--Astronomical Art, Sci-Fi, Space Fantasy, Speculative (Space) Fiction, Cosmic Expressionism, etc. then the name International Association for the Astronomical Arts would have been a more inclusive one for these sub-genres?
You make good points, Kara. I've e-mailed the Astrona website asking them to contact me regarding my work.

One factor that raises a red flag for me is that there is at least one vendor--Amazon--advertising on the same page displaying my image and quotes. As Kara suggests, this means that Astrona is potentially using our work to drive a revenue source. I personally have yet to see any residuals.
--- On Sat, 2/7/09, Julie Rodriguez Jones added:

> At the bottom of his home page it says:
>
> © 2006-2008 Astrona. The content of this website is provided for educational and information purposes only. All images, videos, animations and other shapes of art placed on this website are the exclusive property of their respective artists and creators. While most of the submission are made by their original artists, some of them probably have been downloaded from the Internet. If you hold copyrights to any of the artwork posted to this website, and would like us to remove them immediately, please contact me and I will be glad to do so. Contact Astrona through Email.
>
> He says he'll immediate remove the art. I'll contact him. He has 3 of my pieces.

Yes, I read that disclaimer, but does that make it right and acceptable?

As Ron has said, courtesy would have been to ask the artist's permission. Who knows who and how many have downloaded the art from the internet and for what purpose? Didn't the music industry make a stink about pirating songs without any direct compensation to the musicians? Art is a visual language, and its applications certainly stretch into a vast number of possible sectors for exploitation without any regard and/or compensation to the artist's creative effort.
As I recall - this fellow is a young guy (in his teens) and did ask me for permission about three years back - so perhaps his seeming lack of professionalism is just youth and lack of experience getting in the way of his excitement about space travel and space art.

Personally - I thought is was a pretty good site at the time and still think so - and doubt that he is reaping huge monetary returns from it. In any case he makes it pretty clear (in my case at least) that he had permission and that I am the copyright owner.

Or am I mixing this person/site up with someone else (sometimes it is difficult to sort out just who is who on the numerous sites where stuff appears from time to time.

The only time I have been ripped of my art (that I know of at least) was a 4-5 second showing of one of my pieces (In Jupiter Space - as I recall) within a pretty good amalgam of NASA photos and stupendous music about space on one of the amateur video show-sites (might have been You-Tube) and NASA got a note of copyright ownership (so I guess he thought my scene was a NASA photo - kind of a backhanded compliment at best)! But it was such a small image on his presentation I doubt anyone would ever connect it to my stuff anyway! And it certainly could not be used to any degree by anyone else picking it off his video presentation!
I agree that the site was well put together. That it should be removed was never the intention. I was merely asking the question whether our artists were aware of the site containing their art work? Had they given permission to the host to display their artwork? A simple "yes" would have sufficed. However, that wasn't the case and our artists now had to take their initiative to consider their options. If they do nothing, then I expect that they won't complain later that they were viloated of their copyright priviledges.

As ever I am late to the party.

However I see that the work of members is still available for free down load on the site.

I am just a beginner so no one is going to snatch my art and put it up to attract folk to their page. It is not attributed when hitting on the larger image on their website and yet on my own site I can stop the 'save as' happy hunters of big images. Yes - I realise anything can be copied but the vast majority of folk get stuck thinking of ways around it.

If this Astrona use my property without permission, I would not have the gracious response of so many here. I may not send a death ray their way but I would without delay lay into them for infringement and false enrichment.


Kara Szathmary said:

I agree that the site was well put together. That it should be removed was never the intention. I was merely asking the question whether our artists were aware of the site containing their art work? Had they given permission to the host to display their artwork? A simple "yes" would have sufficed. However, that wasn't the case and our artists now had to take their initiative to consider their options. If they do nothing, then I expect that they won't complain later that they were viloated of their copyright priviledges.

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